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- Jun 11, 2019

Engineers Develop Potential Successor to Shrinking Transistors

Pollyanna Sidell - Associated Environmental Systems

blog-post-transistorsUT Dallas Professor Kyeongjae Cho and collaborators developed the fundamental physics of a multi-value logic transistor based on zinc oxide. Credit: University of Texas at Dallas Computers and similar electronic devices have gotten faster and smaller over the decades as computer-chip makers have learned how to shrink individual transistors, the tiny electrical switches that convey digital information.

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View the original article at Communications of the ACM

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